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Reauthorization of 9/11 Health and Comp Act

September 19, 2014

The Honorable Kirsten Gillibrand
United States Senate
478 Russell Senate Office Building
Washington, DC 20510

The Honorable Carolyn Maloney
U.S. House of Representatives
2308 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington, DC 20515

The Honorable Jerrold Nadler
U.S. House of Representatives
2110 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington, DC 20515

The Honorable Peter King
U.S. House of Representatives
339 Cannon House Office Building
Washington, DC 20515

Senator Gillibrand, Representative Maloney, Representative Nadler and Representative King:

On September 11th, 2001, the United States suffered its most devastating attack on U.S. soil by a group of thugs and murderers.  That attack, which by any standard was an act of war, was responded to by thousands of men and women in uniform – both law enforcement and firefighter uniforms – who had one other distinguishing characteristic, they all wore a badge.

That badge, earned only after taking an oath to "protect and defend the American citizenry," propelled them forward into the battle ‐while thousands of others were running out.

Seventy‐two law enforcement officers died during this attack, including three federal agents ‐ FBI Special Agent Leonard Hatton, USSS Master Special Officer Craig Miller and U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Refuge Manager Richard Guardano. 

During that battle, those first responder warriors held the line ‐ even when the Towers fell, the Pentagon Collapsed and United 93 was sacrificed into the ground. Afterwards, they maintained a vigil for months in the search for survivors and recovery of those lost, without thought or regard for the dangerous conditions they were working in.

Today, over 2,500 have developed cancer and over 60 law enforcement officers have died, all tied to their 9/11 exposure. Statistics have shown that this problem will only get worse and the James Zadroga 9/11 Health and Compensation Act was the only hope many had. 

We applaud your leadership on this issue of national importance and want to assure you that the Federal Law Enforcement Officers Association (FLEOA) strongly supports the reauthorization of this act via H.R. 5503 in the House of Representatives and S. 2844 in the Senate.

Those first responders that answered the call didn't flinch or falter. After 9/11, the nation vowed to Never Forget. We expect that Congress will not allow the plight of first responders’ health care to be forgotten and will pass the re‐authorization of the James Zadroga 9/11 Health and Compensation Act without delay.

Respectfully,
Jon Adler
National President